Ops Cast

Revenue Operations in the Military with Carter Wright

August 12, 2022 Michael Hartmann, Mike Rizzo, Naomi Liu and Carter Wright Season 1 Episode 63
Ops Cast
Revenue Operations in the Military with Carter Wright
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we talk with Carter Wright about Revenue Operations in the Military. Carter is currently Manager of Revenue Operations with the US Army. He has been with the US Army in a variety of roles, including combat duty. Most of his roles have been in and around Sales and Marketing. In addition, he is actively pursuing more knowledge about marketing and revenue operations and is a freelance consultant. 

Tune into this episode to hear about: 

  • Carter's career journey and how he became so interested in Revenue Operations.
  • Carter's take on how the concept of Revenue Operations applies to the Military. 
  • What he sees as the primary use of ops and tech in recruiting.
  • The importance of data and analytics in his current role.

Episode Brought to You By MO Pros 
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Michael Hartmann:

Hello, everyone. Welcome to another episode of OpsCast brought to you by the MO Pros now powered by marketingops.com. If you're not a member, you should join soon. Today I'm joined by my cohost, both of them. So all three of us are here. Naomi Liu and Mike Rizzo. Mike doesn't wanna admit that. What is this? What we call this? Your Mike?

Mike Rizzo:

It's the year of the MO Pro it's the year of the MO Pro.

Michael Hartmann:

all right, Naomi. Say hello, please.

Mike Rizzo:

I just feel like people are gonna get tired of me saying that to them all the time, it's okay. So the year of the MO Pro folks is the year of 2022. just for those that listen to this later,

Michael Hartmann:

Oh, yeah.

Mike Rizzo:

said that was the year of 2022

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah. I guess we actually have to do that now because I, as I was telling you, as we, before we recorded, I talked to somebody who's like on episode 10 around the time we went from being live to recorded. Yeah. So I guess we actually do need to call that out. All right. Today our guest is Carter Wright. Carter is currently manager of revenue operations with the US Army. Carter has been with the US Army in a variety of roles, including combat duty. So he's legit. Most of his roles have been in and around sales and marketing. In addition, he is actively pursuing more knowledge about marketing and revenue operations. And as a freelance consultant, so you might be asking yourself, how does marketing and sales apply to the military? That is exactly what Carter's going to share with us. Carter, first of all, thank you for your service and thanks for joining us today.

Carter Wright:

Hey I appreciate it. I'm glad to be here. Yeah, first, I gotta throw out my disclaimer. All right. These are opinions are my own and not my employers. They make sure I get that out there anytime. I come on just just to be safe rather than sorry. Getting that out there. Yeah. Glad to be here. I actually I, I. Cover or for the recruiting for the army, which I view more as sales than I do actually recruiting the way that we do it. And I think the Army's starting to come around to that idea cuz they actually pushed out an email not too long ago, asking if we feel like we're getting enough sales training or if we've been doing it on our own. So maybe I'm not alone in that aspect. But yeah, I work up in the operations cell and. Going from top of the funnel from our marketing leads all the way through the funnel, when they, the sales funnel and they leave out for basic training. So that's way I looked at it was revenue operations is one way that I viewed it is so that's, as I come and learned the terms, that's what I went with and that's why I call it revenue operations for the army unique. I know.

Mike Rizzo:

I like it.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah. It's different. And Carter and I got the chance to talk to him earlier a few weeks ago. And at first I was truthfully, I was skeptical about like how, what the connection was. And so I think it was interesting to hear how, what, think the majority of our listeners are out there in B2B world, or maybe B2C world and. Yeah, trying to apply this to traditional marketing and sales. So I think this will be an interesting one for our listeners to get their heads around.

Mike Rizzo:

Sorry, I'm gonna interject here. Shout out to Andrew who called me out and said, Hey, on my profile on marketing ops.com I don't really fall into the categories of B2B or B2C or B2 So I need something more specific than that. So I'm actually curious, Carter, what would you say? Like it's B to C it's a to C R B to consumer, like

Carter Wright:

I I view it as B2C. Yeah. That's best way I can describe it to people is B2C.

Mike Rizzo:

Okay. Fair enough. Fair enough. For Andrew. I think I have to list it as he, he works in the education sort of arena. And so I just said, EDU,

Carter Wright:

Right.

Mike Rizzo:

that's what we'll put there. I don't know what else to say.

Michael Hartmann:

Good. Yeah, I think it's gonna be realistic. And before we get too much into this sort of connection between revenue ops marketing ops and the military, we'll get to that in a few minutes. Like I think first Carter, why don't you just share with our listeners your journey, your crew journey and how kinda, how that has led you to be interested in the area of revenue and marketing operations.

Carter Wright:

Yeah. Surely. Yeah. Joined up straight outta high school. September 11th happened while I was in basic training and then signed up to be special operations. So I jumped out of planes, kicked indoor. I was on the invasion into Iraq. They even wrote a book about it about the invasion with the 82nd Airborne. And then did a few tours, got picked up for recruiting duty. And then I got to watch It was purely sales driven at that time. Not a lot of marketing going on besides the civilianized company that we had. Cause we, we do have an agency that covers it some marketing, so we agency side and then we have what we call the green Cedar side, which is those in uniform. Y'all can still hear. Okay. Perfect. And then so I watched it evolve as, as well as as technology evolved with us, we started getting more marketing data and then yeah, I'll do that. Mike, we started getting more marketing data which helped me get better at my job. So I'm the guy that every time we got a new link I started clicking things and figuring things out. And that helped me get good at recruiting. Cause I could I could see where my competition was, what they, and where they were being productive because our we go all the way down to zip code level. And I can see when my direct competition say the Marines, the Navy and everybody, they're writing contracts in a specific area. And because I know their message that they're pushing, I could tailor my message that way as well. And so then when social media started coming about. I started using that to leverage different areas and everything out there as well to help push my market. But we have quite, quite a bit of reports that we use to analyze. So we have hundreds of segmentations that we have all over. The us that we used down the zip code level. So I can search for a specific persona or segmentation per zip code that would also give me background knowledge on how to shape my message. And so the more. Marketing data that we were able to obtain that really helped me progress through my career. So I ended up moving from a basic what I call sales up to running an office. And then from there I moved into enablement and then eventually into where I'm at now and then without dominating too much. How I got into enablement was actually. Funny. So I reported to a new office cuz they move us every two to three years to make sure that we can function well across the us. And then it was my second day in the office. I didn't even have my computer yet. And I was asked to put together a brief of our area and what my, basically my strategy would be in order to increase our market share and So I worked on it all weekend. Got it set up that Monday. And then basically the people I was briefing, they're like, Hey, you know what, you're gonna come work for us. And then I spent the rest of my time traveling to different stations, showing them how to use their data in order to be more successful their marketing data. And and that's basically how I got to where I'm at now. Cause I went from enablement and then up to revenue operations.

Michael Hartmann:

So I'm curious before we move on a little bit, I'm curious so I can't remember if you told me this or not, but your title, your does your actual title inside the army? Is it say revenue, operations? Is it, this is something different, cuz I was, what was interesting to me is you were using terminology that I wouldn't normally associate with, I think recruiting for the military. And my get, by the way, my guess is you probably have me in your database, not me, but my teenage sons, but that's a separate

Carter Wright:

Hundred percent

Michael Hartmann:

so yeah. So are, do you, when y'all are talking, do you use that more of the civilian language or are you using more of the military type.

Carter Wright:

The only thing that we don't use that's civilian night language is like my title's in the army is just operations because every. Every every unit has an operation cell, so they don't make the specific differentiator between if I was still infantry on the front lines, there'd be an operation cell for planning missions and everything. So we're just called operations here. But as far as market share segmentation personas, we have a little bit different name for personas segmentation. We do use Yeah, for the market share we use. So it, it would really, some of the verbiage I have had to learn all over again. So what you guys call ICP? We don't use that term. We use targeted market which I know that's used a little bit different as well. What you guys call a map is different than what I call a map. And so for us a

Mike Rizzo:

You're like my map is literally a map with topographical

Carter Wright:

Yes, we have that one too, but we also have our map is more of a picture of just the sales funnel

Mike Rizzo:

Okay.

Carter Wright:

percentages that really break it down. Barney style, is the best way to put it for somebody just coming to recruiting, to be able to see the picture and understand where they need to be at. But yeah, so our map is called a mission assessment plan.

Mike Rizzo:

Okay. Got.

Carter Wright:

And then CRM, we don't call our system a CRM. I learned that from listening to a lot of people we do have our own CRM that is not out there to the public that that we use to get all our data, put all of our leads into It mirrors a lot. Like one of our reporting system is called by zone. I could only assume it's mirrored a little bit off of power buy and we have our own G2 site and yeah. So we get a lot of sites that I've heard a lot of things about, but not quite the same. I can put it that way.

Mike Rizzo:

Is it proprietary tech? Sorry, Naomi I jumped in Is it proprietary tech that you have on the, on that's being developed or is it backed? Do you know if it's backed by? I haven't heard the name, so I guess I could do a Google search, but.

Carter Wright:

So we are getting a new CRM that I can't tell you who is backed by, but I know was backed by somebody you guys know. Out there, but yeah, there, there is a new one being built right now for us. The one that we're working with now I couldn't tell you who the originator is. I could assume is just because of how different it is from most which I've noticed some similarities, but it, it seems pretty unique to us. So I, I think we, I think the army at some point crafted this one because I've been using a version of this one since about. 2009

Mike Rizzo:

Oh yeah. Okay.

Naomi Liu:

I guess from my perspective, I'm curious if you run into challenges when it comes to like budgeting or budgets, is that something that's under your wheelhouse of responsibility? Do you have to make business cases, whether it be developing tools internally for support, or even just going out and acquiring new ones? What does that look like for you? I'm curious how that differ.

Carter Wright:

Yeah. Our system's a hundred percent internal in that aspect. So there is no add-ons or anything onto our system. That's compatible because of our security encryption. So anytime anything needs to be added it's a lengthy process. It's gotta go through a security background. Fitting to make sure it can fit with ours. And I think that's probably part of the option with our new CRM we're working on now. I know it's been in the works for over a year now and it was supposed to roll out a lot sooner than it has, but part of the issue that I'm hearing is is our security protocols that we gotta deal with. So cuz we deal with a lot

Mike Rizzo:

would say that is a very common problem.

Carter Wright:

Yeah.

Naomi Liu:

I'm just gonna say that too, like

Mike Rizzo:

there's something we definitely share.

Naomi Liu:

Yeah.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah, but I think Amy would, I think what I'm hearing from Carter is that two things, I think it the level of, because he talked about encryption, I talked about security in a more general sense, usually when I'm thinking about our tools not so much, I'm sure there's some encryption, but not a huge amount, but the whole procurement process Carter am. Am I right? That I think where Naomi was going. I thought it was a really interesting question. Cause I hadn't thought about this until she brought it up. Is that yeah, I think for the most part in our roles, we have a little more, some amount of autonomy on making choices about tech. I see Naomi nodding, so that's good. I'm but it sounds are you're you're in a position where you might make suggestions on what tools or technology could be used, but it's the actual decision making and the acquisition of it, the procurement and the, the deployment of it all happens at a higher level. Is that accurate?

Carter Wright:

Yes. That's a hundred percent accurate. Yeah, we don't get to we get to put in input, but that's about all we get. So if we want any improvements with with our stack and everything, we can send it up. And then sometimes we hear back eventually. Or sometimes we just wait and see what happens.

Michael Hartmann:

I, you're probably not alone. People at large organizations that are not military focused probably have similar scenarios. I know I've heard of them. So how, what other ways are you making the connection between? Cause one of the things I noticed when you're on LinkedIn is you're out there talking about revenue, operations and marketing operations. It sounds like you've been doing a lot of educating yourself as well. How, how are you using that knowledge or your sort of your background in connecting the dots? What are the major connection points do you see between. What you're doing from a military perspective, understanding that there's technology and unique, maybe unique privacy stuff, things like that. With what you're learning about call it like civilian enterprises.

Carter Wright:

Yeah. That's one of the reasons why I joined LinkedIn was to basically learn from everybody on there. I've been doing a lot of working through other CRMs to learn about them. I've been talking to a lot of people in the different fields and Gauging, Hey, this is what I do. This is what you guys do and getting feedback on what's similar or not. I attended a few webinars. I've done. I, I did the rev ops HubSpot summer school, which I can see some similarities there. But yeah, I'm getting a lot of feedback just from people that I'm talking to. Things that I'm learning. It's gonna sound really like I. Really bad about this, but I probably listen about three hours of podcasts a day to try to make sure that I'm getting the knowledge of what everybody's talking about. Make sure I get the lingo down a little bit and it helps me out with getting similarities as well. Just in ingesting a lot of content between LinkedIn podcast anything I can find online for training has really been helping me find some similarities. A few of the people that I've talked to online they'll post some HubSpot tutorials or whatnot, and then I've seen some that are similar to the way our systems are set up. And so I'll comment that because it's refreshing to see that there is some similarities there. And then I've got guys that that used to be. Not specifically in my position, but have worked in the same organization as far as recruiting for the army. And I've talked to them that are now out there that work for different companies like Salesforce and that kind of thing. Got 'em on LinkedIn. I was like, Hey, let me bend here for a minute. And I talked to them and they'll tell me what's similar to their system compared to what we use. And. So basically lots of research is how I spend a good portion of my day when I'm not on LinkedIn.

Mike Rizzo:

jealous. I wish I could do research and education for any length of time beyond just the little micro bits that we get in moments like this, where we're talking to folks like you're teaching me stuff right now. Just thinking about how you're strategizing on your learning methods, I think is awesome. And then on top of that the foundations of this community were like, oftentimes you're quite alone in the role in most organizations. And so certainly the part of the success factor is just the fact that we have people to connect with and talk to. And what I love about your effort Carter is that. Even though this isn't exactly a fit it's still helping you, which is awesome. And I'm glad to hear that you're able to absorb and make connections through the community and through the rest of the research methodologies that you're implementing. Super smart to I, would've never thought to go look for other folks that have done your role, who are now at civilian roles. So good on you, man. Kudos to you.

Carter Wright:

Appreciate it. Yeah, it's it was a steep learning curve. When I first got on LinkedIn, it was a bit intimidating cuz you're like, what can I share that resonates with with everybody else since our systems, aren't exactly the same. I had to figure out what's the same and what's not in order to even get out there. And some of that came down to I, I didn't understand the right names for titles. Enablement, we just call training. Like I was the training supervisor and

Michael Hartmann:

Sometimes, I think that would just be better if it was just called training.

Carter Wright:

but yeah, like when I did enablement, I traveled all over California, 39 different recruiting stations and I'd trained them on, market share and everything. And I view them as. 39 small businesses you could say. Cause they each have their own set of challenges and markets that they're in. Because the farmland in California's completely different than when I was in San Francisco. So like completely different markets there, completely different messages they gotta put out. And so when you. It's their own challenges that you get to go in and analyze and try to help 'em come up with a strategy on how they're gonna do things. And I really enjoyed that. And then it ended up pushing me up another level to where I'm at now and to be able to do that I just don't get to travel as much.

Michael Hartmann:

So I'm curious you mentioned Mike caught it as well. The, that you're connecting with people who are formally in, in role, similar to your, who are. It sounds like they're out the military at least from an active standpoint. Yeah, I'm wondering, are you getting, I assume you're getting value out of learning the language that at some point, I assume maybe not. You want to, you're going maybe leave the arm, the army, but are, so I, that makes sense to me, are you then also bringing some of that language back into. You're into the army and you, and your, maybe your, I dunno if you have counterparts in other parts of the country or the world yeah. Are you, how are you applying that daily into what you're doing and doing that translation, which, by the way, I agree with Mike I, I kudos to you because I actually, when you're describing that I was thinking how I've had, I've worked with multiple different technologies in the big ones, both Marketo and qua. Little bit of exposure to HubSpot. And part of that is just learning the language that they all use for essentially the same thing.

Carter Wright:

Yeah, the it is helping a lot. Matter of fact, I was having with one of my bosses. We were actually cuz just like everybody else, we have trouble with attribution

Michael Hartmann:

did you just say one of your bosses?

Carter Wright:

Yes

Mike Rizzo:

Yes. I was thinking the same thing. I was like, Ooh, that's a fun one to deal with.

Michael Hartmann:

So he was just gonna slide that one in.

Carter Wright:

basically I could break it down is. Yeah. Yeah. Just, easiest way to break it down is I have a COO COO and CEO is the positions that I'll call them just for namesake, but I could go by rank, but it wouldn't mean a whole lot for here. And matter of fact, I'm feeling. One of them had to go out for surgery. So I'm filling the CRO role now as well. So I'm multitasking for the next six weeks.

Michael Hartmann:

That's awesome.

Carter Wright:

So we're just having discussion about attribution and just like everybody else we, sometimes we have a hard time tracking attribution as well. And so I basically, as I was talking to him, I was like, this is something that comes up a lot, according to these people that I've talked to cuz you know, he wanted to do some dropdown menu surveys and everything like that for the people that we got in listing. And I was like if we leave this lock open to see where they actually came from much like a lot of people talk about it'll give us more accurate data than what we can trace back in. Reports. Cuz again, we it's one of the many reports. I'm sure we all track is attribution. Contact times and we got leads scoring and everything for our marketing leads that come in as well as our sales leads just like anybody else. I don't know why I got such a bad connection today, but yeah. I was having a conversation with one of my bosses about attribution for our leads. And so I was talking about all the things that I've seen on LinkedIn and everybody talking about and some of just. Studies that have been published about leaving some sales open instead of having everything a dropdown for for some of our closed deals, or if you wanna call it fed our enlistments about how they actually found us, whether the recruiter found them, whether it was the Facebook ad, et cetera, on how they actually got there. And not just so much of what we could pull in our reports in the system. And so being able to go back and use. What we've been talking about as far as attribution and what I've been learning from LinkedIn from everybody on there and a different portion of everything that read in my research, I think it has helped I've been going around it's definitely helped with my personal social media savvy, because I've learned a lot from everybody on their, on social media. I was not as good as social media and I'm still working on that previous, but learn a lot of tips and tricks. We actually have a just everybody else. We have a digital marketing team. That's co-located with me that that we use up here. And so we sort out people's strengths and assign 'em to that get 'em trained up and then we make it that their primary focus, but then we track those leads like that as.

Michael Hartmann:

That's interesting. We talked a little bit about the like technology and like encryption kinds of constraints that you work under. Can, I don't know how much you can share, obviously there's we don't wanna get into something that's not public domain, but just curious for our audience and our listeners, what do maybe based on your research and what you know about how you have to operate within the army what are some of the like big constraints that you've got from a technology standpoint? We talked about the procurement challenges. I get that, but just to the pure technology piece that you feel like might be different if you were not in the environment you're in.

Carter Wright:

There's some days where the encryption on my computer will even block Google. So there's lots of websites that are blocked for us. I can't just connect to any printer or anything like that. I. I have to, there's a specific printer that I have to be connected to. But as far as technology goes a lot of the same reports and everything that, that that I've seen out there are pretty similar. They took away our email marketing platform from us. It was not performing up to snuff. So that's one of the one of the things I would say that is a major issue, right? For both marketing and sales is that the mass email capability and be able to schedule emails out is not there for us anymore, which I know is something they're working on. But outside of that the only way to access our entire CRM is on a specific computer that they give us that we have to be able to plug our ID card in cuz it's got a chip in it. And Then we so gotta be on a secure network, gotta log in. And yeah, so it makes it challenging. I can't connect just anywhere I was at a different location yesterday and I was trying to get secure. I even turned my VPN in on and everything and it it rejected the network. My encryption would not connect to the network, which made it terribly hard to get done when I needed to get done. I had to move to a different location. Remote work is definitely not a thing for us. Yeah. We we, when COVID first hit I'd say we did remote work for about for about a month, but we rely so much on in person because once they make it to a certain point in their decision, they actually have to take a test that's proctored and then they have to go to a physical location. In order to take the physical and all paperwork's gotta be signed in front of somebody else to verify as a witness and same thing with our signatures. So yeah, it was about a month that that we didn't do that, but yeah, remote work is not a thing. I've heard good things about remote work, but it's mainly been through being Vic curious. So

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah, so that I was gonna ask about that. Glad you talked through it. Yes. So that sounds like one of the challenges is just, the ability to work from different places. That's actually probably a big one for a lot of our listeners that would probably try they're probably like, oh my gosh, what am I gonna do? I actually have to go into an office on a daily basis. Some of them might like that. I don't know. But my sense is the majority of our audience is not in that camp.

Mike Rizzo:

I'm perfectly. All right. With my remote work situation.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah.

Mike Rizzo:

you could do that technology from anywhere. It's fine.

Carter Wright:

That kind of the best part of having so many stations is no matter where I go in the country. There's always a recruiting station close, so I can always pop in and connect to their network if I needed to worst case scenario.

Naomi Liu:

But you couldn't, fly to the middle of Europe in a remote island, somewhere off the coast of Spain and sit on a Sandy beach and pull out your laptop. That's is that not the dream?

Carter Wright:

We do have military bases and recruiting stations in both of those locations.

Naomi Liu:

wow. Amazing. Okay. Shows how much I know about as a Canadian about American military I'm like really you guys

Carter Wright:

Yeah, we got we got bases in Italy and Germany and in Spain and not big bases. They're normally dual with mul multiple branches and everything there. But yeah we got bases all over the world.

Michael Hartmann:

Naomi. I always think of something just a little more practical. So you think about the stories we've all probably heard and I you've brought this up, like the waking up in the middle of the night going, is that email gonna go out the right way tomorrow?

Naomi Liu:

Out last week, I was like, oh my gosh, did I just accidentally pur am I gonna wake up? And our entire databases purge because I did some change yesterday and they're just,

Michael Hartmann:

So you like, so like I, so Carter, I like that actually is a, can you get into a facility like at,

Carter Wright:

I can get into my home network. And I can connect there, but worst case scenario my again, I have more key cards that'll get me into the building that I'm at. So I gotta scan one for the elevator, one to get in through the door one to get in through the office upstairs. And

Michael Hartmann:

I can't even imagine. I can barely keep up with the one I have. If I go into an office.

Mike Rizzo:

I was just thinking the same thing. I was like, man, I got one key for the house and I think there's a different one for the locker that I get at the gym. Whenever I go there that's confusing enough for me.

Michael Hartmann:

Right.

Mike Rizzo:

just trying to get in through five doors. Woo.

Michael Hartmann:

That sounds like, so I got to tour, oh gosh. One of the credit bureau data centers, once it happens to be here in the Dallas area, can't remember which one it was, but it was the same thing you had to card swipe in, you had to card swipe out. You had it was the most secure place. I'd. Most career place I've probably ever been actually. And it doesn't sound like it's even close to what you're doing with Carter.

Mike Rizzo:

I think I should implement that for my home office though. Speaking of remote work,

Michael Hartmann:

Are you, are there knock, are there knocks at your door right now? Mike,

Mike Rizzo:

Not yet the kids aren't home, but I'll tell you what, the four year old likes to come in and, find his way and talk to me about some superheroes and stuff.

Michael Hartmann:

do a little dance.

Mike Rizzo:

yeah, definitely.

Carter Wright:

I completely understand that mine my turns for this next week, actually.

Mike Rizzo:

ah, good stuff.

Carter Wright:

he's definitely all about that.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah, I get it. That's crazy. Okay. So another let's I wanna jump into something cuz you've brought it up and I know you and I talked about this. Carter is the amount of data and analytics and reporting that you all do. Kinda going back again to, so based on kinda your own discovery and research and learning, how, how much do you rely on data? How much do you think that translates to? Are those listeners that we have that are in kinda the B2B or B2C space? I.

Carter Wright:

Yeah. Just like everybody else data is a good point that we use Wheaton. There's we have basically a report for everything. But we use data a lot, but then we also try to rely on the what we call boots on the ground, the guys on the front lines, and then talking to our recent enlistments. We talk to them as they enlist and then through the process before they leave out for basic training. But yeah data does speak a lot for us. So we'll go. I set up probably more. PowerPoints with graphs and data that I end up having to present more than I'd like to say, but it's,

Michael Hartmann:

you have to suffer through taking data and putting it into a PowerPoint, just like the rest of us.

Carter Wright:

hundred percent. Yeah. Matter of fact, once we're down here because our our month ended today, so we're our days are offset. And it is mainly for for the flow of things. So I got probably two hours of reports to wrap up once we get off here to close out our month. And it goes through. A lot of information that we're gonna go through demographic ages. We're gonna go through where they originated from how many visits they had to take before they made it to their final journey. What zip codes they came from, what geographical location. And yeah, and then I take all that and put it in a graph. That's easy to. that way I can can brief it with some, a few bullet points, but just like anybody else take, takes a while to dig through all the reports to make that pretty graph.

Michael Hartmann:

It definitely does. And I don't know anyway, but you just talked about lead source. I know Naomi, we could appreciate that lead source and demographics, and you got the whole bit there, so good stuff. Carter, this has been amazing. Is there anything we is anything that we haven't touched on that you'd wanna make sure that our audience would hear from you?

Carter Wright:

No only thing I can say is is I appreciate what you guys do. Definitely learn a lot from you guys on here and. The Mo pros website, definitely looking forward to seeing that coming along. I got I keep, I can't get a picture on their right. I'm gonna figure this out though. Figure it out. My picture's always too big to, to I'll figure that part out.

Mike Rizzo:

Send it to me, Carter, I'll help you out. I got some ways to help you there and we'll send it back so you can upload it, but we appreciate you being a part, being a learner with us, being a community member. And we appreciate what you do too, cuz you know, that's pretty important for a lot of us here in the us anyway.

Michael Hartmann:

Absolutely. So Carter sounds like LinkedIn is the place to, to keep up with what you've got going on. Is that right? Or is there any someplace else that people should connect with you if they want.

Carter Wright:

Yeah, LinkedIn is the place to find me. Carter L right, is is my handle. You can find me on there. And I'm on there more than I'd like to admit.

Michael Hartmann:

That's right. We probably all could say that from time to time. So no, no judgment

Mike Rizzo:

Definitely raising my hand on.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah.

Mike Rizzo:

As I'm submitting a comment right now. I'm not multitasking.

Michael Hartmann:

Yeah. That never happens around here. All right. Carter, thank you so much, Mike. Naomi, thank you. As always, it's a pleasure. Thanks to our listeners for continuing to support us in providing us your feedback and support and ideas for topics and guests. If you have more, certainly reach out to Naomi, Mike or me, and we can get that rolling as well. So until next time, thanks everyone.

Mike Rizzo:

Bye everybody.

Carter Wright:

Bye.